Cats Evacuated From The Carolinas Need New Homes

Any time that a natural disaster happens, animals are usually in need of new homes. Unfortunately, this particular time is no different with regard to the hurricane that hit the coast of the Carolinas and Virginia. In the Carolinas alone, there is a staggering number of cats that need to be rehomed in order to give them a safe place to stay. There are mainly two reasons that this has happened in such high numbers. The first is that there was already a very large influx of cats in shelters, waiting to be adopted in both North and South Carolina. This was a problem before the hurricane ever hit because shelter workers were having a difficult time finding people to adopt these animals. Once the hurricane hit, rescue workers started bringing in animals that were stranded in the storm, further exacerbating shelters that were already taxed to their limits.

There’s also a third factor at work here, and it was ultimately the deciding factor when it comes to the need to find a different home for these animals. In many cases, the shelters themselves have been compromised and are no longer capable of providing a safe place to stay for these cats. As a result, it’s becoming more and more necessary to find a different place for them to be. Many people might think that it would be prudent to move them to another shelter that’s further inland or even in another state. However, the logistics of such an operation are almost impossible, even under good weather conditions. When you factor in all of the flooding, tornadoes and other issues that the Carolinas are currently experiencing, it becomes very difficult to perform any type of mass movement from one location to the next.

As such, many of the shelters in the areas have started making impassioned pleas to individuals all over the country, explaining to them the need for these cats to be adopted. In many cases, they have found a way to ride out the storm temporarily, but that doesn’t change the fact that they have far too many animals to take care of for an extended period of time. Therefore, several of them are utilizing social media and even more traditional forms of media in order to get the word out. In short, they’re looking for people to come forward and adopt animals at a much greater rate than what many shelters consider average.

Of course, there is every effort being made to reunite the cats that have been separated from their owners, provided that their owners can be found. Even for the animals that have been microchipped, it’s difficult right now because for the most part, it’s impossible for the people at the shelter to track down the owners of the cats. Once things start to calm down and people get back into a daily routine, the hope is that people will come searching for the animals. Until then, the shelters are tasked with taking care of them. Unfortunately, past disasters have shown that the majority of animals that end up in the shelter are never reclaimed. In some cases, this is because their owners don’t know where to look, sometimes causing them to overlook a certain area as opposed to contacting the right shelter. Sadly, there are some cases where the owners are no longer able to contact the shelter in order to retrieve their lost pets.

While the shelters realize that any time of natural disaster happens, they’re going to be hit hard with an influx of new animals, it is exceptionally difficult to deal with that at the same time that they’re dealing with being right in the heart of the disaster themselves. For the most part, the shelters that didn’t or couldn’t evacuate the animals before the hurricane hit are effectively cut off from society until things calm down. That being said, that doesn’t stop them from getting an influx of new animals that are lost in the area, nor does it stop them from turning to social media in order to try to get these animals back to their original owners or adopted out to someone else before it’s too late. The main goal is to make sure that innocent animals are not euthanized simply because no one comes forward to claim them. The use of social media around the country is a fairly new approach for shelters, but people who work there are hoping that it’s one that will be effective.


Add Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

100 Cats Airlifted from Shelters Hit by Hurricane Michael
Mobile Cat Clinic Takes it to the Streets to Fight Pet Overpopulation
Delaware’s Animal Cruelty Laws now Apply to all Cats
Survey Tracks Cat Owners’ Behavior To See How Obsessed With Cats They Really Are
10 Things You Didn’t Know about Minskin Cats
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Arabian Sand Cat
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Chantilly Cat
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Somali Cat
What Do You Do with a House Full of Cats that Don’t Get Along?
An Emergency Preparedness Checklist for Cats
“Why is My Cat Always Hungry?” Here are Some Answers
How to Evacuate with Cats in an Emergency
Household Chemicals Harming Your Cat’s Thyroid
Kidney Disease in Cats: What You Need to Know
What is Coccidiosis in Cats and How is it Treated?
What is Triaditis in Cats and How is It Treated?