Tennessee Woman Creates Cat Adventure Club

A Tennessee woman has created a new club that is geared toward helping cats become hiking buddies for their owners. Laura Partain of Nashville, Tennessee has created a new club that can help cat lovers to prepare their beloved pets for jaunts in the great outdoors. The story was reported by WBIR 10 News, and it is an eye-opener that offers a new way for cat owners to connect with their pets and help shy animals to overcome their timidness.

Tennessee Woman Creates Cat Adventure Club

Partain is the founder of the Tennessee Cat Adventure Club. This is a new organization that was launched during the recent pandemic. This is a club that focuses on teaching cat owners about training their cats to go out on walks and hikes with them. This is similar to how dogs are used as hiking companions. While most of us leave our cats behind in the safety of their own homes, it’s possible to train a cat to adapt to a harness and to take them out walking, just like you would your dog.

Benefits of the Cat Adventure Club

Partain has trained around 14 cats since the pandemic first started. She had previous experience in training show goats, and she transferred the skill to training cats to work with a harness and a leash. This helps to ensure the safety of the animal and to keep them restrained so the cats cannot run off and get lost during outings at the park. Some cats are shy and don’t want to go out. They may get nervous, so it can take several months for a timid cat to complete the training, but in the end, it is well worth the effort. Walking is an excellent type of exercise for both owners and cats. It helps to give them exposure to new things and get some healthy exercise at the same time. Partain offers training services for cats, but she also encourages cat owners to train their pets to start training their cats for harness and leash use. Although the training process for cats is a bit different than training a dog to adapt to a leash, it can be done.

Leash training cats is not uncommon

Cat owners have been finding new ways to include their beloved pets in their daily activities. While the majority of cat owners believe that cats are stay-at-home pets because of their flightiness and tendency to run off, some have learned that cats can be training to do a lot of interesting things. One of the latest trends for cat lovers is to leash train their pets and take them out with them on runs or walks.

Adventure Cats leash training

Adventure Cats offers a useful online resource for training your cat to adapt to a leash. They explain that the first thing to do is to find a harness that fits your cat comfortably. The harness is more secure than attaching a leash to a collar. It is also more comfortable and safer because there is no risk of slipping the collar and escaping, or choking if you need to pull your kitty back with the leash. If you make the training process a positive experience for your kitty he will be easier to train. Take it slowly and introduce one new thing at a time to let him become accustomed to the harness, then add the leash and start with walks around the yard.

Can all cats be leash trained?

Some cats may be easier to leash train than others. It’s best to start while they are younger and more adaptable, but most cats can be leash trained unless a cat has severe anxiety issues. Having said this, taking your cat out for a stroll in a safe area can help to alleviate boredom and give him some new forms of excitement. He will have the opportunity to get out and smell new scents and become accustomed to new things. It might be touch and go for the first few excursions, but in time, most cats will come around to the new experience and some may look forward to their outdoor adventures. There may be a few exceptions. While most cats can successfully be leash trained, depending on the age, health, and personality of individual cats, there may be some instances where it is not recommended. You shouldn’t force your pet to go too far outside of his comfort zone.

Patience is required

It’s important to be patient when leash training your cat. Move slowly and void adding too much stress in his life. If he is uncomfortable, make sure that you reassure him. It’s a good idea to start slowly by leaving the leash or harness near his food dish so he will get used to seeing it and smelling it. Do this before you put it on him. Introduce the harness slowly, try it on him, and give him treats for his cooperation.

PETA recommendations for leash training cats

PETA recommends finding a harness that is lightweight and offers chest coverage. Let your cat play with the harness, and put it on for the first few times before mealtime. He will come to associate the leash with treats. Start your outdoor excursions at times when there are not a lot of noises. Some loud sounds can frighten cats and make them nervous. Start slowly and take him out on paths where there are not a lot of people or other animals around to help him grow accustomed to the leash. Let him sniff around and explore the area and gradually increase the time spent outdoors with the leash. With a little time, effort, and patience, you can successfully train your cat to become your new walking partner.

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