What if Your Cat is Pooping on the Bed?

What should you do if you discover that your cat is pooping on your bed? This is probably enough to make most cat owners seriously question whether or not having a cat is worth it. However, before you decide to get rid of the cat, you might explore some possible reasons that this is occurring, not to mention things that you can do to potentially correct its behavior.

The question you need to ask yourself is whether or not this is a new behavior. Hopefully, it’s not something that has been going on for quite some time and you’re just now getting around to doing something about it. Therefore, there’s a better-than-average chance that your cat hasn’t been doing this for very long. That means that for some reason, your cat has started engaging in a behavior that isn’t considered normal. In fact, any time that a cat poops anywhere but in its litter box, it’s time to start looking for reasons so you can find a solution.

The first thing you should do if you’re having this problem is ask yourself whether or not anything has changed recently. The changes don’t have to be major ones, either. It could be something as simple as a change in your work schedule that the cat hasn’t yet grown accustomed to. Having someone that has lived in the home move away or bringing a new person in can also create this type of behavior. It doesn’t matter whether you’ve had a new baby or you brought another animal into the house, it can be enough to trigger this kind of reaction in your cat.

Before you get upset with your cat, take it to the veterinarian and make sure that there isn’t a medical reason that this is going on. Sometimes, cats will misbehave by defecating and urinating somewhere other than where they have traditionally gone because they’re ill. You want to rule out the possibility that this could be the problem and the only way to do that with any level of certainty is to have your cat examined thoroughly by a trusted veterinarian. If anything does come up, the problem can be dealt with right then and there. If no physical cause is found, you at least have the peace of mind of knowing that your cat is physically healthy. Now, it’s up to you to figure out what’s going on with it from a behavioral standpoint.

One your cat has been cleared medically, it’s time to start looking at other issues. Perhaps your cat is doing this because it’s trying to assert its dominance, either over you or over some other person or animal in the household. This type of behavior can at times be somewhat difficult to break. You might try merely keeping the door to the bedroom closed and refraining from allowing the cat into the room, effectively eliminating its ability to gain access to the bed in the first place. If this doesn’t work, explore other options by moving your cat’s litter box, spending more time playing with your cat and even changing its diet.

If you’re still having issues after you’ve done all of these things and you can’t figure out what’s going on, it might be time to contact someone that specializes in cat behavior. They’re not always easy to find, but they do exist. Just like you would call in somebody who works with canines if your dog were having behavioral issues, you can call in a specialist that works with cats in order to deal with behavioral issues that are specific to them. More often than not, they can pinpoint the problem and make reasonable suggestions that can alter the behavior of the cat in short order. Typically, it all comes down to something that has upset the cat and caused it to behave differently that it usually does. Once that problem has been successfully dealt with, the cat usually goes back to displaying it’s normal behavior. If you have a cat that you never really had any other problems with, there’s a good chance that this is exactly what’s going on. On the other hand, if your cat has routinely displayed various behavioral problems over the years, this is probably something that is very much past due anyway.

The bottom line is that you can’t allow the cat to continue pooping on your bed. That means you have to do something and simply getting rid of the cat isn’t the answer. There has to be a reason that this behavior started so your first step is to get to the bottom of it and figure out what’s going on. Then, you can work on a solution based on the reason it’s occurring in the first place.


Add Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Petting a Kitten
Study Proves Petting Your Cat Relieves Stress
Nursing Home Cat
Cat Pays Adorable Visit to Former Owner at Nursing Home
Lost kitten
Lost Kitten Rescued After Being Stuck Under Someone’s Car
Tom Cat Transforms from Injured Stray to Beloved Pet
10 Things You Didn’t Know about Minskin Cats
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Arabian Sand Cat
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Chantilly Cat
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Somali Cat
Cats and Marijuana
Keep Marijuana Away from Your Cat, Period
Cats on the Counter
How to Keep Cats Off the Counter
Cat Gagging
Why Your Cat Gags and What to Do About It
Why Your Cat Wakes up at the Same Time Every Day
CBD Oil for Cat Anxiety: How Does It Work?
What are The Causes of Ascites in Cats?
Household Chemicals Harming Your Cat’s Thyroid
Kidney Disease in Cats: What You Need to Know