How to Stop Diarrhea in Cats

Is your cat having frequent and loose bowel movement or even liquid bowel movement? Well, there is a chance your cat has an infection, has a serious illness, or its new diet does not agree with it. Depending on what is causing, it can occur suddenly and last for a few days or last for many weeks if the cat is suffering from something serious. Generally, if the diarrhea last for a day or two, then stops, all is well. The only danger is if it lasts for over two days because it can cause dehydration. With that in mind, we are going to discuss what you should know about cat diarrhea.

Causes of Diarrhea in CatsĀ 

  • Food intolerance
  • Allergic reaction
  • Change in diet
  • Feeding the cat spoiled food.
  • Viral or bacterial infection
  • Bowel inflammation caused by diseases
  • Internal parasites such as Giardia or round worms
  • Tumors in the cat’s digestion tract
  • Liver or Kidney diseases
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Colitis

Symptoms of a Cat experiencing Diarrhea

The most obvious symptom of diarrhea to look out for is loose and frequent stools. Other signs you should also look out for include:

  • Blood in the stool or mucus
  • Flatulence or straining to defecate
  • Dehydration
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Weight loss
  • Decreased appetite
  • Increase urgency to defecate
  • Fever

In extreme cases, the stool may have some bloodstains or it may be black in color. Such signs could indicate internal bleeding in the small intestines or stomach, and you must take it to the vet immediately for examination and treatment.

Treating the Cat for Diarrhea

The first step you should take when you notice your cat is having diarrhea, is to stop giving it any food for the next 12 to 24 hours. Instead, you should give it plenty of clean water to stop it from getting dehydrated. You should then consult a veterinarian on the proper course of treatment.

Time to Take the Cat to the Vet

You should take the cat to the vet if the diarrhea persists for more than a day, and you notice that cat is experiencing vomiting, lethargy, fever, bloody stools, dark-colored stool, unexplained weight loss, decreased appetite, or it strains to defecate.

What You Should Expect At the Vet’s Office

The first thing the vet will do is ask you a few questions about what you have been giving the cat to eat, as well as any other symptoms you may have noticed. They may also ask you about the cat’s history, such as whether it has suffered from diarrhea before. At this point, it is worth mentioning anything that you believe may have caused the illness.

If your cat does venture outdoors, it is also worth mentioning that to the vest as well as if you sometimes leave it under someone else’s care.

After that consultation, the vet will examine the cat, and possibly take a stool sample for further analysis. They will be looking for any parasites in the stool to confirm if the cat is suffering from a parasitic infection. Other tests may include some blood work to identify other possible causes of diarrhea in the cat.

Other common tests that you should expect include ultrasound, radiographs, cultures, biopsy, and endoscopy. Overall, the vet will perform different tests, which may vary from one cat to another. Factors that will determine the types of tests conducted will include duration the cat has suffered from diarrhea as well as the severity of the cat’s condition.

Is My Cat Likely To Suffer From Diarrhea?

Generally, you cat should not suffer from diarrhea on a regular basis. However, if your cat has frequent hairball, it is also likely to suffer from diarrhea periodically. Moreover, if your cat spends lots of time outdoors, it is likely to ingest something that may cause diarrhea.

How to Lower the Chances of your Cat Getting Diarrhea

While cats may enjoy eating dairy products, you should not give them to cat. Almost any cat will enjoy the taste of yogurt or milk. Unfortunately, some adult cats do not have enough levels of lactase, the necessary enzyme for digesting dairy products.

Without lactase, the lactose from dairy products moves into the large intestines where it ferments. It will then cause it to have diarrhea or gas. Lastly, if you are going to switch your cat’s diet, you need to do it gradually. Try giving it a mix of the old food along with the new food. If it does not show signs of diarrhea, then increase the portions of the new food gradually.

We hope that you found this guide to be informative, and your cat will enjoy a healthier lifestyle.


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