What is Cat Trilling and Should You Be Concerned?

Most animals make a sound of some sort and this is what people associate with them. For example, dogs bark and go woof, while cats purr and meow. However, purring and meowing are not the only sounds that cats make. Cats vocalize their feelings in a whole range of ways, from yowling to hissing, and from crying to trilling. The latter is one of the sounds which is lesser-known by those who do not own a cat. This is a noise that is similar to a purr but louder and more excitable. Here is all you need to know about cat trilling.

The Reason Cats Trill

Most cat owners will know that the high-pitched trilling noise is usually made by cats when you come home. This is because it is a cat’s way of giving a positive greeting. It is also a mother cat will do when she is near her kittens as a way of getting them to follow her or to pay attention. A cat will often trill at their owner as a way of getting attention and encouraging them to play. Trilling is also a way for cats that live in the same home to greet each other.

Why Do They Not Just Meow?

Trilling and meowing differ in the way that cats create the noise. A meow is done with the mouth open and a trill is a noise made with the mouth closed. While a meow can have both a positive or a negative meaning, a trill is nearly always positive. Just as humans have a wide vocabulary to use express their feelings, a cat will use an array of noises and body language to express their emotions. Meowing and trilling are simply two of the different methods of vocalizing how they feel.

How They Make the Trilling Sound

Trilling is a strange sound that is very high-pitched and is not made by other animals. If you have heard your cat trill, you may have wondered how they can create such a noise. You may have even tried to replicate the noise yourself and found it difficult to mimic. This noise is created by the cat pushing air through their voice box without opening their mouth or expelling the air.

How Often Does a Cat Trill?

Some cats will trill a lot and others will trill very rarely. This is simply a matter of personality differences. While some cats are very shy, others are boisterous or sociable. The shier they are, the less likely they are to trill regularly. The ones who enjoy being the center of attention are likely to trill a lot. To put it into perspective in comparison to humans, it is the same as some humans being very chatty and others preferring to keep themselves to themselves.

Can You Have a Conversation with a Cat?

Most cat owners realize that trilling is a way for their cat to communicate with them. It is not uncommon for cat owners to engage in ‘conversation’ with their cat when it is making this noise. As their cat trills, they will respond or ask their cat a question. While to some people that may seem a strange thing to do, animal experts have confirmed that cats understand this type of communication. While they may not actually understand the meaning of the individual words. They pick up on the tone of a person’s voice. If they are trilling back to you, it means that they have perceived your communication with them as positive and if they trill back, they are also trying to convey a positive vibe.

Do I Need to Worry About Cat Trilling?

The short answer to this question is no. Trilling is generally a very positive noise that a cat makes when it is happy and comfortable. It is not an indicator that there is anything wrong with your cat either emotionally or physically. Therefore, trilling is not something about which you should worry. Even if a cat is trilling much more than other cats you have had in the past, this is also not a concern. It simply means that this cat likes to seek attention more than your previous cats and trilling is their preferred way of expressing their happiness to you.

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