What’s Normal and What’s Not with Your Cat’s Eye Discharge

When you own a cat, it is important that you try to keep your pet as healthy as possible. To do so, you need a good understanding of your cat’s anatomy and to know what is normal and what is not for your cat. You should observe your cat for any changes as this is sometimes an indicator that your cat is suffering from a health condition. While some of these are a cause for concern, others are nothing to worry about. One potential problem you may notice is discharge from your cat’s eyes. Here is an overview of when this is normal and when it is a cause for concern.

Different Breeds

Some cat breeds are more prone to eye conditions than others. This is often due to the shape of their face and eyes. Some breeds that are more susceptible to eye discharge include Persians and Himalayans. This is a problem that affects many cat breeds that have a short nose and large eyes. If your cat fits into this category, then a small amount of discharge is usually not a concern. However, you should not assume that all discharge is because of their breed as there is still a potential problem. If there is more eye discharge than usual, you should seek the advice of a vet who will tell you if your cat needs treatment to tackle the problem.

Small Amounts of Discharge

In most cases, a small amount of discharge is not a cause for concern. Although a healthy eye should not have any discharge, there are occasions when your cat may get a small amount of clear discharge. This usually dries on the eyelids and looks light brown and crusty. This is not usually a cause for alarm and is generally caused by a small amount of dirt entering the eye and the body reacting to get rid of the tiny foreign object. If the problem doesn’t persist, then there is no need for a trip to the vets.

Possible Causes of Discharge

There are many things that can cause your cat to suffer from eye discharge. Dirt and bacteria entering the eye can lead to an infection called conjunctivitis and the main symptom of this eye discharge. Entropion is another possible cause of discharge from your cat’s eyes. This is an eyelid that rolls inwards and causes the hairs on the skin to irritate their eye, leading to discharge. A further possible cause is a corneal ulcer. This is when an open sore develops on the cornea of your cat’s eye. It is always important to seek the advice of your vet to determine the cause of your cat’s eye discharge.

When a Discharge is a Cause for Concern

There are some occasions when eye discharge is a cause for concern, and you should take your cat to see the vet. Look at the discharge from your cat’s eyes. If it is yellow or green, this is not normal and they need to see the vet. You should also watch for your cat rubbing or scratching at its eyes or the eyes becoming red. These are both indicators that your cat has a more serious problem. If you notice any of these signs, take your cat to the vet for an examination.

Keeping Your Cat’s Eyes Clean

One of the best ways to avoid your cat experiencing eye problems is to keep their eyes clean. This reduces the likelihood of dirt or bacteria entering the eye. This is especially important if you see discharge beginning to develop. You can clean their eyes using s soft, damp cloth. Just wipe across their eyes from the outer edge in towards their nose to remove any discharge or wateriness. You can also buy products to do this from the veterinarian or from a pet products supply store. However, you should avoid any products that contain alcohol.

Overall, cat eye discharge is often nothing to worry about and some cat breeds are prone to getting a little discharge occasionally. However, it can also be a sign of a problem with your cat’s eyes. If the discharge is yellow or green or the eyes become red and irritated, always get your cat checked over by the vet.


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