10 Ways Adopting Senior Cats is Better than Adopting Kittens

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There are so many reasons that adopting an older cat is superior to buying or adopting a kitten. Of course, there is nothing wrong with getting a kitten to grow with your family and love for the rest of its life, but there are so many reasons to get an older cat. Most people consider older cats unworthy of their time given the fact that the cats are not as small and cute as a kitten, but we have a few good reasons an older cat is just right for you. Read on to find out why you should adopt an older cat.

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Kittens Grow Up

You’ve got it, folks. The bad news about kittens is that they eventually grow into that big cat that you don’t want to adopt. That’s right; it’s not going to stay small and cute for long. It’s going to become larger and grow up into the cat that you could adopt right now and avoid the entire kitten phase all together, but have not thought about just yet.

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Older Cats are Appreciative

Older cats up for adoption know what it’s like to have no one to care for them. They know what it’s like not to have a family that loves them and appreciates them. They know what it’s like to have a family and then not have a family, and then have a family again. These cats are very appreciative of the life you give them, and they will work very hard to show their appreciation.

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You Get a Health Guarantee

Cats up for adoption are checked out by shelter vets and are treated for any health conditions from which they might suffer. That means if your cat has fleas or worms or anything of that nature, they’re already being or have already been treated for them. It’s one less issue you have to worry about. Additionally, you’ll know what you’re getting into long before you make the decision to adopt.

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You Know What You’re Getting

This is a cat that already has a personality established. This means that adopting this cat means you get what you see, and there will likely be very little change in the personality of your cat. What you see when you meet your potential new cat is what you will bring home, and that is a nice thought. The behavior of an adult cat that’s in a shelter is behavior that is already habit. Unlike a kitten, that might change its personality over time.

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Adult Cats are Less Trouble

Kittens are overly curious and get into a lot of trouble. They will do things that they shouldn’t, and they have to be trained. No, training a kitten is not like training a dog. That doesn’t mean, however, that you won’t have to spend time teaching the kitten not to get on the counter, but an adult cat probably already knows that this type of behavior is unacceptable.

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Adult Cats Get into Less

Kittens are a bit like puppies. They like to play with things and they like to chew on things and they like to make a mess. They will get into anything you leave out, they will be nosy and they will make sure that they have gotten into any and everything possible in less time than it takes for you to tell them they can’t touch or look at something. Adult cats aren’t as curious, so they will stay out of things and get into less trouble. If you have a lot of ‘stuff’ in your home you feel cats might get into, you might consider an adult cat as a preference in lieu of a kitten that might get into everything you have lying around the house.

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Adult Cats are Calmer

Adult cats have already been through their very nosy, curious phase, and they’ve matured. Like a child or a puppy, kittens can be rambunctious and very busy. Sometimes that’s a bit too much for families to handle. Older cats are calmer and more relaxed, and they will cause you less drama in the house. They’re not going to attack your guests or your kids, want to play as much in the middle of the night and they’re less likely to annoy you as often.

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Adopting an Older Cat is Saving a Life

When there is no more room in the shelter, they have to get rid of animals somehow. Shelters are not proud of this, and they don’t like to do it, but it does happen. And it doesn’t happen everywhere, let’s make that clear. However, older cats are more likely to be euthanized first to make room to house the smaller cats that have come in needing shelter. Since younger cats are more likely to be adopted, older cats are the ones who are sacrificed to make room for these animals.

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Adult Cats are Familiar with the Litter Box

Kittens aren’t difficult to teach to use the litter box, but it is just one less thing you will have to do if you make the decision to adopt an older cat. This is something that they’ve been doing for a long time, especially if they’ve been in a shelter. All you will have to do is show them where the litter box is located and the rest is history. That’s a pretty nice concept for those who don’t want to go through the potty training that’s required of other animals – or kids.

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Adult Cats are More Tolerant  

If you have kids, you might prefer an older cat. Why? Because adult cats are more tolerant of kids and certain behaviors. And adult cat is less likely to attack a child for grabbing too tightly, holding its tail or acting inappropriately. A kitten, however, is more likely to scratch and potentially harm a child. It’s not because the kitten is mean, by any means, but it is protecting itself and it is scared. Adult cats are more likely to tolerate this behavior and move somewhere so that they can no longer be reached by grabby little hands.

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