6 Things to Look for and Ask any Breeder with Ragdoll Cats for Sale

Ragdoll Cats

Not all cats are the same, but not everyone is aware of this. So many cats just look like “average” cats, and it’s not as common to see a breed that looks different, which is one of the reasons people mistakenly assume all cats are pretty much the same. The Ragdoll cat, for instance, is markedly different than the average house cat. This is a cat that has very clear blue eyes and a colorpoint feature. The cat was created by an American breeder and given its name because the breed has a tendency to go completely limp when it is picked up.

This particular cat is often found through breeders. You won’t find a great deal of ragdoll cats for sale at local pounds or animal shelters due to the fact that they are an expensive and desirable breed. Most people who buy this cat keep it for life. When one does make its way to an animal shelter, it’s snapped up and adopted before it has time to adjust to life in the shelter. If you’re in the market for a ragdoll cat, don’t make the mistake of assuming all ragdoll cats for sale at a breeder are the same. And don’t make the mistake of assuming that all breeders were created equal; they certainly were not. We have a list of things to look for and questions to ask when it comes to finding the perfect cat and the perfect breeder.

Are You Comfortable?

When you walk into a breeder’s location, how do you feel? Do you feel uncomfortable or comfortable? Do you feel that the location is clean and tidy, and that the animals that are running around are happy and content? If not, you might want to trust your gut and get out. A good breeder is going to have a facility that’s clean, well-kept and cats that are happy, playful and not at all skittish. Anything less than this and you run the risk of walking out with a cat that may have some adjustment issues. Trust your gut; it’s usually correct. You should never purchase a ragdoll cat that’s for sale with a breeder you do not feel comfortable with or from a breeder whose facility seems as if it’s not up to the standards that a cat breeder should meet in terms of care and safety for their animals.

Has the Kitten Been to See the Vet?

All good breeders work with a trusted vet to ensure their cats are in great health and condition. Your breeder should have taken each kitten in the litter to the vet after they were born to have shots and be checked out. Be careful not to simply take the word of the breeder, however. Ask to see the paperwork from the vet to ensure that the information you are given is correct. Additionally, you want to see what the vet has to say about the health of the kitten you want to take home prior to getting it home and realizing that the cat is sick or unhealthy in some way.

Ask for References

It’s not ridiculous to ask a cat breeder to give you a list of people who have purchased his or her cats in the past. It makes perfect sense that you would want to check with owners to see if they are satisfied with their experience, if they are satisfied with their animal and if they would recommend the breeder. Some people will surprise you with their answers, and some breeders might not be willing to hand out this information. However, you should consider it a red flag if a breeder isn’t interested in giving you a recommendation so that you can get some trusted advice.

Ask About Family History

You’re not going to adopt a child without knowing if there is a family history of illness or if the mother was healthy while pregnant, are you? No; and you should have the same consideration when it comes to buying a cat. You’re spending a great deal of money to buy this cat, so you should have some sort of guarantee that you’re not buying one that has a family history of health issues. Your breeder should be more than happy to provide you with the health records of the parents of the kitten you want to purchase. These records should indicate all veterinary visits, all health-related concerns and every procedure the cats have been through. It’s a good indicator as to whether or not you can expect your new cat to have any issues.

What Kind of Food Does the Breeder Use?

It’s not such a big deal for all animals, but when you’re looking at ragdoll cats for sale and considering one for your own family, you should ask what the cat eats. You might be able to give the cat food you see fit in your own home, but some cats have health concerns that require they consume only certain foods or even specific foods. You do not want to gloss over this question only to find out your kitten has a sensitive stomach and can only consume the most expensive cat food in the world once you get home and try to feed it – or make it sick.

Ask About Limited Registration

What’s this? This is a timeline that some breeders require that you have your cat fixed (spayed or neutered) by a certain point in the kitten’s life. If you were planning on using the cat to breed and not having it fixed, it will help to know this before you sign any documents. Many breeders will require that you sign a document stating that your cat will be fixed within a specific timeframe. Some breeders do this so you can’t breed your cat with others and take their business. Others do it – and this is the most common reason – because there is already an overpopulation of cats and dogs in the world, and preventing the birth of unwanted animals is a good way to keep population control over the cat population.

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