Bella Thorne Has 19 Cats: Is That Wrong?

Recently, it was revealed that Bella Thorne has 19 cats. This has caused a lot of people to wonder about whether she can be counted as a responsible pet owner or not, seeing as how 19 cats is more than a little bit excessive by the standards of most people to say the least. However, it is important to remember that the situation is more complicated than it seems on initial inspection. Is There a Problem with Bella Thorne Having 19 Cats?

First, most people will have heard of animal hoarders, which would be the people who wind up with more pets than they can take care with. A situation that tends to turn out poorly for both them and their pets, not least because of serious sanitation issues. Curiously, said individuals tend to believe that they are actually doing something good for their pets, which should make it very clear that animal hoarding is rooted in mental health issues. This is supported by studies that suggest that animal hoarders are often suffering from some kind of trauma, though progress in understanding this particular topic is hindered by the fact that it seems to have more than one potential cause.

Regardless, it is important to note that animal hoarding isn’t based on the number of pets that can be found in a particular household. Instead, it is based on the criterion of an excessive number of pets that are well-beyond the pet owner’s capabilities to care for. Under normal circumstances, 19 cats would be a serious warning sign. However, Thorne has a much greater ability to care for her cats than most people, meaning that what she is doing can’t be counted as animal hoarding, particularly since interested individuals can actually get a good idea of the care and consideration that she shows her cats.

With that said, there is one potential issue that is worth mulling over. In short, Thorne started out with two cats less than a year ago but now has 19 cats in total. This isn’t because she went on some kind of an cat adoption spree. Instead, this is because she refused to spay and neuter her cats, which proceeded to do exactly what one would expect under such circumstances. For the time being, 19 cats are still well within Thorne’s capability to care for them, but one can’t help but wonder how many more cats she will acquire should she continue to refuse to spay and neuter her cats. After all, a cat population can increase in size at a rapid pace, particularly when it doesn’t need to deal with limited resources and the other issues that confront cats living on their own. Something that will become particularly pressing once the kittens mature enough to start having kittens of their own.

On top of this, there is another potential issue in that Thorne might influence the opinions of other cats. In short, cat owners have an understandable desire to avoid causing harm to their cats, which is why spaying and neutering makes so many people so uncomfortable. However, spaying and neutering are two of the most important tools in the fight against the over-population of cats, which is so bad that animal shelters have to put down millions and millions of cats on an annual basis because they just don’t have the resources to care for all of the stray animals that they take in. For that matter, it should be noted that stray cats tend to suffer atrociously out on their own, not least because most pet cats just don’t have the skills needed to survive under such circumstances because they were never taught them. However, even the stray cats that have grown up in said environment tend to struggle, not least because their breeding rate results in an inevitable pressure on the ability of their environment to support them. Theoretically, Thorne’s choice to not spay or neuter her cats could encourage other cat owners to do the same, which could have much more unfortunate outcomes in their cases because most people don’t have the same ability to care for pets that Thorne does.

Summed up, there is no real problem with what Thorne is doing because it isn’t detrimental to either her or her cats. There is a small chance that there will be unfortunate consequences in the long run, but even then, the impact will likely be minimal in the grand scheme of things, meaning that it isn’t really worth getting worked up about.


Add Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

What is the 99 Lives Cat Genome Sequencing Initiative?
Pheromones Effective at Decreasing Feline Aggression
How Cat Tongues Work Can Inspire Human Technology
According to New Study, Your Cat’s Personality Is Likely To Match Yours
10 Things You Didn’t Know about Minskin Cats
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Arabian Sand Cat
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Chantilly Cat
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Somali Cat
Tips on How to Prevent Feline Diabetes
11 Funny Gift Ideas for Cats and Cat-Lovers
Why Do Most Cats Hate Water?
Four Reasons to Open Your Mind to Older Pets
Household Chemicals Harming Your Cat’s Thyroid
Kidney Disease in Cats: What You Need to Know
What is Coccidiosis in Cats and How is it Treated?
What is Triaditis in Cats and How is It Treated?