Here’s Why Your Cat is Peeing on the Bed

Cat Peeing on the Bed

Most people think of their bed as a sanctuary where they can relax and sleep. That is not the case if your cat suddenly begins using it as their litter tray. While it may feel to you as though your cat is doing this in spite, that is not the case at all. So, why does your cat pee on your bed? There are several possible causes, and it is important to identify the cause if you want to stop your cat from urinating in inappropriate places. Here is an overview of some of the potential causes

Medical Problems

According to Catster, one of the first things to consider is that your cat is potentially suffering from a medical condition if they start to pee on your bed. Just some of the potential conditions from which your cat is suffering include diabetes, urinary tract infections, hormonal imbalances, and arthritis. If your cat starts urinating on your bed and this has not been an issue before, it is worth getting your cat checked over by a veterinarian. They can give your cat a thorough examination, and conduct any tests needed to determine whether there is an underlying medical cause for this behavior. Depending on the results of the tests, your cat may need to begin treatment for the condition identified, or the vet may need to conduct further tests

They Need an Elevated Position

A cat instinctively feels safer when they are in an elevated position. In the wild, they climb to higher points so that they can get away from danger and easily identify potential threats as they approach. Climbing to a greater height is also a hunting technique that wild cats use to look for prey. Some cats do not like using their litter tray because it is on the floor and it is somewhere that they do not feel safe. So, they look for an elevated position to urinate, such as your bed or the armchair. This is simply reflecting their natural behavior in the wild. To make them more comfortable using their litter tray, you could try putting it in an elevated position temporarily to see if it makes a difference to your cat’ toileting behavior.

Anxiety

According to Vet Street, another reason your cat may urinate on your bed is anxiety. Vets say that anxiety-related issues are some of the leading causes of cats urinating in unusual places. A cat may suffer anxiety if they have problems with their owner, if they have an issue with another cat or dog in the house, or if they suffer from separation anxiety when left alone. Consider whether any of these causes is potentially a source of anxiety for your cat. Alleviating some of their anxiety can help to stop them from urinating around your home.

Relationship Problems

A further reason that a cat may begin urinating in unexpected places, such as your bed, is that they are having relationship problems. This does not necessarily refer to sexual relationships, but more to relationships with other cats in the house or the neighborhood. Cats are extremely territorial and they also have a status hierarchy. If another cat is attempting to come into your cat’s territory, either in the garden or in the home, they feel the need to mark their territory in several places. Unfortunately for you, this sometimes means that they will mark your bed as their territory. This is often more of a problem if you introduce a new cat into your home. You may need to keep them separated for a while and introduce them gradually. Having a dog in the same house as cats can sometimes cause a similar problem, and a cat may want to exert their status in the house over the dog. Again, you may need to introduce the two animals gradually to reduce the anxiety it can cause and limit potential problems between the two animals.

Litter Box Problems

The reason why your cat stops using the litter box is potentially a problem with the litter box, says Pet MD. One problem is that it might not be in a good location, such as an area where people are constantly walking past. Some cats won’t use a litter tray if it is too big or too small, so this is one instance where size does matter. Furthermore, using a new brand of cat litter can deter them from using their litter tray. If the cat litter differs in smell or texture to the litter to which they have become accustomed, then they may find somewhere else to urinate.

How to Stop a Cat Urinating on Your Bed

The first thing to do is always to visit the veterinarian to check for potential medical problems and to seek their advice. If no medical cause is found, the easiest of the other potential causes to tackle is the litter box itself. Try changing the size and location of the litter box. If you have recently switched cat litter brands, revert to your usual product. Often, making these changes will resolve the issue without any need for further investigation. If urinating on your bed or your other furniture is still a problem, then you will need to consider the possibility of your cat suffering from anxiety or having issues with other cats, either in your home or in the neighborhood. These issues are often a little more difficult to tackle, but your vet can advise you of strategies to use that may help.

Cats Urinating on Your Bed – The Final Verdict

Overall, cats urinating on beds is a more common problem than you may think. Identifying the cause is vital for you to stop this behavior. While a medical problem is a potential cause, there are many other reasons for this behavior. These include anxiety, relationship issues, the desire for an elevated position, and problems with their litter box. You may need to tackle all of these issues individually to uncover the cause and solve the problem.


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